WASHINGTON, Aug. 8, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Entrepreneurship remains strong in rural areas, despite a nationwide drop in self-employment over the past 30 years, according to data gathered by SCORE, mentors to America's small businesses. 80% of rural small business owners believe the quality of life and cost of living are superior to urban or suburban areas, although they struggle to find funding, to hire the right workforce and to reliably access digital technology.

Entrepreneurship remains strong in rural areas, despite a nationwide drop in self-employment over the past 30 years, according to data gathered by SCORE, mentors to America’s small businesses. 80% of rural small business owners believe the quality of life and cost of living are superior to urban or suburban areas, although they struggle to find funding, to hire the right workforce and to reliably access digital technology.

"Data shows that rural businesses tend to operate at a higher profitability margin than urban businesses, and they typically earn comparable revenue to urban businesses," said SCORE Acting CEO Bridget Weston. "What this means is that rural entrepreneurs have the advantage of keeping more of their business revenue, which makes it possible for them to provide a higher quality of life for themselves and their families."

Rural areas maintain a slightly higher percentages of entrepreneurs than urban areas: 

  • 6.5% of people in rural areas were self-employed in 2016, compared to 8.4% in 1988
  • 6% of people in suburban areas were self-employed in 2016, compared to 7% in 1988
  • 5.7% of people in central cities were self-employed in 2016, compared to 5.2% in 1988

Rural small businesses earn comparable revenue to urban businesses, and are slightly more profitable (56% vs. 53%):

  • Revenue earned:
    • <$100K in revenue: 21% of both rural and urban small businesses
    • $100K-$1M: 52% of rural; 49% of urban
    • $1M-$10M: 24% of rural and 26% of urban
    • >$10M: 3% of rural and 4% of urban

40% of rural small business owners have trouble accessing capital, so many rely on personal savings:

  • Personal savings: 71% of respondents
  • Loan from a community bank or credit union: 14%
  • Investments or gifts from friends and family: 13%
  • Loan from a large bank: 6%
  • Angel investor or seed funding: 4%
  • Online lender: 3%
  • Crowdfunding: 3%

Rural entrepreneurs struggle to find employees with the right skills, experience, and geographic location, citing major barriers such as:

  • 74%: Finding candidates with the right education, skills or training
  • 72%: Finding candidates with the right kind of experience
  • 69%: Lack of talent pool in local area
  • 53%: Finding candidates willing to relocate

Digital technology has helped rural small businesses to increase sales, but more than half of rural small businesses do not have reliable access to technology:

  • Digital technology increased gross sales for rural businesses by 17.2% during the past three years
  • 20% of rural small businesses generate at least 80% of their revenue by selling online

However:

  • 56% of rural small businesses do not have reliable access to digital technology
  • 20.6% do not have high-speed broadband
  • 5.4% still use dial-up access

Download the infographic for more information on trends in rural entrepreneurship.

About SCORE
Since 1964, SCORE has helped more than 11 million aspiring entrepreneurs. Each year, SCORE's 11,000 volunteer business experts provide free small business mentoring sessions, workshops and educational services to clients in 300 chapters nationwide. In 2018, SCORE volunteers helped to create 32,387 new businesses and 103,300 non-owner jobs.

For more information about starting or operating a small business, or on volunteering with SCORE, visit SCORE at www.score.org. Follow @SCOREMentors on FacebookInstagram and Twitter for the latest small business news and updates.

­­Contact Information
Betsy Dougert
800-634-0245
media@score.org

WASHINGTON, July 11, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Small retailer businesses make up 98.6% of all retail firms, and employ nearly 40% of all retail workers, according to new data gathered by SCORE, mentors to America's small businesses, in honor of National Independent Retailer Month. Data also shows small brick-and-mortar retailers are remaining competitive by creatively engaging online to bring customers into their stores.

 

Small retailer businesses make up 98.6% of all retail firms, and employ nearly 40% of all retail workers, according to new data gathered by SCORE, mentors to America’s small businesses, in honor of National Independent Retailer Month. Data also shows small brick-and-mortar retailers are remaining competitive by creatively engaging online to bring customers into their stores.

"Over the past 20 years, the Internet has steadily disrupted the retail industry, which has led some to assume that brick-and-mortar stores would eventually become a thing of the past," said SCORE CEO Ken Yancey. "Instead, this data shows how small brick-and-mortar retailers are successfully adapting their shopping experiences through strategies such as omni-channel sales, entertaining in-store events and special promotions, which appeal to the modern consumer's busy lifestyle and evolving needs."

Small retailers, with 50 or fewer employees, make up a majority of the retail industry:

  • Small retailers make up 98.6% of all retail firms.
  • Small and medium retailers have an average monthly revenue of $22,341 and an average gross margin of 51%.
  • Small retailers hire 39.8% of all retail employees.

Brick-and-mortar businesses have an in-store advantage over online-only retailers:

  • Consumers spend 69% of their discretionary monthly income in-store.
  • Ecommerce compromises just 9.46% of total retail sales.
  • 55% of online shoppers prefer to buy from retailers that have a physical store presence, versus online only.
  • Trying items in store is three times more influential than other purchase factors.

Small retailers are using increasingly popular "retailtainment" events to engage and retain customers. 82% of shoppers attended a retail event last year and 58% are interested in going to one in the future. Top events consumers are interested in attending include:

  • Exclusive access to items or sale: 87%
  • Party: 81%
  • Product demonstration or tutorial: 80%

Small retailers that sell furniture and alcohol have the highest average monthly revenues:

  • Furniture: $40K in average monthly revenue
  • Beer, Wine and Spirits: $39K
  • Sporting Goods: $30.4K
  • Jewelry: $30K
  • Furnishings: $28K
  • Beverages $27.7K
  • Electronics: $26.4K
  • Fashion: $25K
  • Specialty Foods: $20.2K
  • Cosmetics & Beauty: $18.6K

Download the infographic for more information on consumer trends in small retail businesses. 

 About SCORE

Since 1964, SCORE has helped more than 11 million aspiring entrepreneurs. Each year, SCORE's 11,000 volunteer business experts provide free small business mentoring sessions, workshops and educational services to clients in 300 chapters nationwide. In 2018, SCORE volunteers helped to create 32,387 new businesses and 103,300 non-owner jobs.

For more information about starting or operating a small business, or on volunteering with SCORE, visit SCORE at www.score.org. Follow @SCOREMentors on FacebookInstagram and Twitter for the latest small business news and updates.

­­Contact Information
Betsy Dougert
800-634-0245
media@score.org

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